CLMR

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Politically Charged Installation of One Million “Bones” in DC

oxane:

Violence flares in Turkey overnight on Sunday as police clash with demonstrators for a third night. Police fire tear gas and use water cannon against protesters in Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir. The initial protests were sparked by plans to build on a city park in Istanbul, but have broadened into nationwide anti-government unrest »» occupy gezi tumblr

oxane:

Violence flares in Turkey overnight on Sunday as police clash with demonstrators for a third night. Police fire tear gas and use water cannon against protesters in Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir. The initial protests were sparked by plans to build on a city park in Istanbul, but have broadened into nationwide anti-government unrest »» occupy gezi tumblr

Solidarity and its Discontents - Raha Iranian Feminist Collective

While building solidarity between activists in the U.S. and Iran can be a powerful way of supporting social justice movements in Iran, progressives and leftists who want to express solidarity with Iranians are challenged by a complicated geopolitical terrain. The U.S. government shrilly decries Iran’s nuclear power program and expands a long-standing sanctions regime on the one hand, and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad makes inflammatory proclamations and harshly suppresses Iranian protesters and dissidents on the other. Solidarity activists are often caught between a rock and a hard place, and many choose what they believe are the “lesser evil” politics. In the case of Iran, this has meant aligning with a repressive state leader under the guise of “anti-imperialism” and “populism,” or supporting “targeted” sanctions.

As members of a feminist collective founded in part to support the massive post-election protests in Iran in 2009, while opposing all forms of US intervention, we take this opportunity to reflect on the meaning and practice of transnational solidarity between US-based activists and sections of Iranian society. In this article, we look at the remarkable situation in which both protests against and expressions of support for Ahmadinejad are articulated under the banner of support for the “Iranian people.” In particular, we examine the claims of critics of the Iranian regime who have advocated the use of “targeted sanctions” against human rights violators in the Iranian government as a method of solidarity. Despite their name, these sanctions trickle down to punish broader sections of the population. They also stand as a stunning example of American power and hypocrisy, since no country dare sanction the US for its illegal wars, torture practices and program of extrajudicial assassinations. We then assess the positions of some “anti-imperialist” activists who not only oppose war and sanctions on Iran but also defend Ahmadinejad as a populist president expressing the will of the majority of the Iranian people. In fact, Ahmadinejad’s aggressive neo-liberal economic policies represent a right-wing attack on living standards and on various social welfare provisions established after the revolution. And finally, we offer an alternative notion of and method for building international solidarity “from below,” one that offers a way out of “lesser evil” politics and turns the focus away from the state and onto those movement activists in the streets.

We hope the analysis that follows will provoke much needed discussion among a broad range of activists, journalists and scholars about how to rethink a practice of transnational solidarity that does not homogenize entire populations, cast struggling people outside the US as perpetual and helpless victims, or perpetuate unequal power relations between peoples and nations. Acts of solidarity that cross borders must be based on building relationships with activists in disparate locations, on an understanding of the different issues and conditions of struggle various movements face, and on exchanges of support among grassroots activists rather than governments, with each group committed to opposing oppression locally as well as globally.

We’ve been talking about the importance of making your privileges transparent in order to be able to say something political. It’s something I learned from reading about intersectionality, which is a way to analyze power by looking at its different categories— gender, race, class, sexuality— and how they interact. Before we started making this album, after not having worked together for a long time, we were interested in getting deeper into feminist and queer theory. So we read post-colonial feminist and anti-racist theory, and with this comes intersectionality. It’s important to see your own position on the scale.

Being brought up in a white wealthy family in a Western country, we were privileged. And we have a privileged position as people being able to make music and study and get asked about what we think about the general political situation. This brings responsibility. When we see people listen to what we have to say, it makes us think about how we can use this attention in the best political way and how we can change our own working process by thinking norm-critically when making choices about who we employ, how we work, what salaries we pay.


Olof Dreijer (via sacraments)
thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
The resignation of Syrian opposition leader Moaz al-Khatib troubles the movement. although they’ve told him he cannot resign.
Colonel Riad Al-Asaad, founder of the Free Syrian Army, lost his leg in a car bomb in an assassination attempt. He is recovering at a hospital in Turkey.
The Syrian opposition government will represent the country at the upcoming Arab League summit in Doha. 
The Syrian opposition has opened its first embassy, in Qatar. 
A former US soldier who served from 2000-03 was arrested upon his return to the US from Syria, where he allegedly took up arms with the Al-Nusra brigade, considered a terror group by the US.
Israel destroyed a machine gun nest inside Syria after troops in the Golan Heights were shot at twice.
Human Rights Watch reports on the mass sexual violence and other abuse faced by internally-displaced Somalis.
Interethnic violence in Nigeria killed at least 27 on Wednesday.
The UN approved a new combat force, called an intervention brigade, in the Congo.
Former Congolese rebel commander Bosco Ntaganda, known as “The Terminator,” appeared before the ICC for the first time on charges of rape, murder, sexual slavery and using child soldiers. 
A coup in the Central African Republic and a dissolution of its constitution puts power in the hands of rebel leader Michel Djotodia.
An appeals court in Bahrain overturned the convictions of 21 medics  for treating protesters two years ago.
The US ceded control of Bagram prison to Afghanistan.
Russia is currently in negotiations with NATO to set up military bases in Afghanistan after the US departs. 
AP’s Kathy Gannon interviews Afghans who have fled their homes in an attempt to escape the American drones. 
The Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan have threatened the life of former President Pervez Musharraf.
Pakistan estimates the human losses for its country in the war on terror at 49,000. 
Authorities raided the offices of the Russian headquarters of Amnesty International. This is the latest in a set of moves by the Kremlin to harass and pressure NGOs.
British police continue to search for clues in the death of Russian tycoon-in-exile Boris Berezovsky.
Thailand has begun peace talks with southern rebel group Barisan Revolusi Nasional. 
The US and South Korea have signed a pact outlining their communication policies and responses to potential North Korean aggression.
North Korea has ordered artillery and rockets into ‘combat posture,’ threatening to target US bases in Hawai’i, Guam and the mainland.
North Korea is cutting off communication with South Korea. 
Iran, Syria and North Korea blocked the arms trade treaty in the UN. Britain and others have requested that the Secretary General put the draft resolution to a vote in the GA to bypass the blockade.
Newly-released court documents show that Somali Shabab commander Ahmed Abdelkadir Warsame, captured in 2011, has pleaded guilty in a closed court proceeding in Manhattan and has been cooperating by disclosing intelligence on Shabab and Al-Qaeda.
The US has sentenced Chinese national and former L-3 Communications employee Liu Sixing of exporting military information to China. 
“Out of Sight, Out of Mind,” a visually stunning and well-designed interactive about every drone strike in Pakistan and their victims. 
Photographs taken by Charles Haughey, who served in Vietnam and took photographs for the Army and the press, have been rediscovered and put on display. 
According to a Harvard study, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will ultimately cost taxpayers between $4 and 6 trillion. 
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Manama, Bahrain. A girl holds the flag at a rally in solidarity with imprisoned activist Nabeel Rajab. Mohammed Al-shaikh/AFP/Getty.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Manama, Bahrain. A girl holds the flag at a rally in solidarity with imprisoned activist Nabeel Rajab. Mohammed Al-shaikh/AFP/Getty.

[I] can’t fathom so much time and energy and money being poured into getting one more privilege for one group of people—especially since the people within that group who will benefit the most are mostly very privileged already—at the expense of countless other really important and much more urgent issues facing the queer community and our society as a whole (bullying and suicides of queer and queer-perceived youth, violence against transgender people, invisibilization of disabled queers and queers of color and disabled queers of color, mass incarceration, etc.), I’m just going to save myself a headache and skip the part where I argue for a more inclusive and intersectional movement and instead let y’all know what you may have missed while you were busy being obsessed with single-issue gay politics.

1 year ago 127 notes via mehreenkasana

jayaprada:

Palestinian Disappointment Ahead of Obama’s Visit

1 year ago 65 notes via shoor © jayaprada
thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
A member of the EU’s Syria delegation was killed in a rocket attack.
A report from the charitable organization Save the Children details the murder, rape, torture and trauma inflicted on the children of Syria. [PDF] UNICEF released a statement calling this generation of Syrian children a “lost generation.”
Rebels released 21 UN peacekeepers on Saturday.
Ankar Kochneva, a Ukrainian journalist captive for several months in Syria, has escaped.
Syria has increasingly lost control of the border with Iraq.
The Guardian investigates why 110 bodies washed up in the river running through Aleppo.
The UN has disputed the claim that BBC video editor Jehad Mashshrawi’s baby son was killed in an Israeli rocket attack. The BBC is challenging this counterclaim, saying there is little evidence that the rocket was instead a Hamas misfire.
Hazem Kandil on deadlock in Cairo in the LRB.
An unemployed man who self-immolated in Tunisia’s capital died on Wednesday.
Journalists are on strike in Mali to demand the release of Boukary Daou, editor of the Le Républicain.
Kurdish rebels released 8 Turks in a promising move for the peace process.
Western weapons are the tools of a crackdown in Azerbaijan.
Seymour Hersh notes the tenth anniversary of the bombing of Iraq.
The Guardian tracks down the stories from the most iconic images of the Iraq War. 
The New York Times’ Lens Blog reprints Dexter Filkins’ introduction to Photojournalists at War, an oral history of the war from the photojournalists who saw from the front lines. 
The family of Amir Hekmati, an Iranian-American former Marine who has been held in Iran for the last 19 months, is pleading for his release.
On the two year anniversary of the Saudi-led intervention, clashes between protesters and security forces have erupted in Bahrain.
The USAF is no longer reporting drone strike data from Afghanistan.
The Atlantic In Focus has a collection of stunning black and white photos (like the one above) taken of anti-Taliban militia activity in Afghanistan.
Mazar-i-Sharif is facing a wave of suicides, particularly young women. 
A suicide bomber detonated at a buzkashi game on Wednesday in the province of Kunduz, killing ten. 
Monday was the deadliest day so far this year for American troops in Afghanistan: 5 soldiers were killed in a helicopter crash in the east.
Over this weekend, Staff Sgt. Bales will begin a court-ordered sanity review.
Parveen Rehman, a well-known Pakistani aid worker and the head of the Orangi Pilot Project to help people escape poverty, was killed by four gunmen on Wednesday.
Former President Pervez Musharraf will return home to Pakistan after four years of self-imposed exile in Dubai.
Gunmen kidnapped two Czech tourists in southwest Pakistan.
Peace talks may have begun with FARC and the economy may be looking up in Colombia, but the Afro-Colombian population seems to have been left behind.
A Chilean court has ordered the exhumation of Pablo Neruda as part of an investigation into allegations that he was poisoned following the 1973 military coup that replaced Salvador Allende with Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
Remembering when journalists became part of the story during Northern Ireland’s Troubles.
Gen. Keith Alexander, the chief of the newly-created Cyber Command, testified before Congress this Tuesday alongside top intelligence official James R. Clapper Jr.
Court documents from the failed federal prosecution of Blackwater reveal a previously secret CIA past.
Kenneth Roth of Human Rights Watch asks what rules ought to govern drones. 
Listen to Bradley Manning’s leaked court statement.
Secretary Hagel has ordered a review of the overturning of a jury conviction of an Air Force Lt on charges of aggravated sexual assault.
Senators like Kirsten Gillibrand grilled military leaders over this case and sexual assault in the military in a Senate hearing.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Logar Province, Afghanistan. Farzad Akbari, the young son of anti-Taliban militia commander Farhad Akbari, poses armed for a photograph. Vikram Singh.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Logar Province, Afghanistan. Farzad Akbari, the young son of anti-Taliban militia commander Farhad Akbari, poses armed for a photograph. Vikram Singh.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Notice: This Week in War, both the post and the newsletter, will be on hiatus next Friday.
French photographer Olivier Voisin died on Sunday of wounds sustained in Idlib, Syria last Thursday.
More than 40,000 people flee Syria every week, and the UN says that the total number of refugees is set to reach a million within the month.
The US will more than double its support of the Syrian opposition and offer “non-lethal aid.”
Saudi Arabia has funneled a large amount of infantry weapons purchased in Croatia to rebels in Syria in hopes of ending the stalemate.
The Syrian opposition claims to have captured a former nuclear site.
Palestinian prisoner Arafat Jaradat died in prison over the weekend. Palestinian officials have claimed torture, as evidenced in autopsy findings, which Israel disputes. He was given a hero’s funeral this week.
Two Palestinian prisoners have ended their hunger strikes.
A Turkish draft plan to end the 28-year Kurdish insurgency has met with promising response. Jailed leader Abdullah Ocalan has promised to withdraw militants by August if the promised reforms are pushed through in Ankara.
Tunisia has captured their suspect in the murder of Chokri Belaid.
A Swiss woman held for a year by armed tribesmen in Yemen has been released.
Qatari poet Muhammad al-Ajami’s life sentence for encouraging the overthrow of the government has been reduced to a fifteen year sentence.
Discussions resumed over Iran’s nuclear program for the first time since July.
Lawmakers introduced harsh new Iran sanctions to Congress on Wednesday.
The National goes inside Tehran’s Evin prison.
According to the UN, Iran has stepped up arrests, torture and executions of prisoners.
Former Iranian prosecutor and Ahmadinejad ally Saeed Mortazavi has been charged with being an accessory to murder in the deaths of anti-government protesters.
Farmers in Esfahan province clashed with Iranian police sent to provide security for a pipeline destroyed last week amidst a water dispute between Esfahan and Yazd.
Karzai ordered US special forces out of Wardak province due to allegations against the special forces of disappearances and torture. 
What kind of merit do these allegations have? Nobody seems able to cut beyond rumor and the US isn’t being forthcoming.
A joint Afghan-NATO inquiry will explore these claims.
The Wall Street Journal obtained access to an internal UN report which says that the UN Development Program has allowed procurement fraud to flourish in its $2.5 billion Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan, which bankrolls the Afghan police.
On Tuesday, Taliban militants poisoned and then shot 17 people in a government outpost in Ghazni province, Afghanistan.
Recently reported statistics on drops in Taliban attacks were apparently incorrect due to a clerical error. 
Gunmen killed veteran Pakistani journalist Malik Mumtaz in north Waziristan. The Tehreek-e Taliban have denied involvement in his murder. 
Founder and former leader of militant group Lashkar e-Jhangvi Malik Ishaq was detained by Pakistani police.
The groundbreaking for a Pakistan-Iran gas pipeline, which has been in the works on and off since 1994, will be March 11th.
Thailand has agreed to talks with the Barisan Revolusi Nasional rebel group.
Dennis Rodman and Vice Mag have had just a lovely time visiting North Korea.
Mexico estimates that 26,000 people have gone missing since 2006.
A rule of law argument against a “drone court.”
Confirmed and sworn in, Hagel has begun his duties as Secretary of Defense.
One of the documentaries given an Oscar nod last weekend was Invisible War, which seeks to shed light on military sexual assault.
Former Air Force recruit Virginia Messick is speaking out about her assault at age 19 by Staff Sgt. Luis Walker.
A Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on military sexual assault has been planned.
Returning female veterans face a growing problem with homelessness, PTSD and substance abuse.
CIA whistleblower John Kiriakou reported to prison yesterday to begin his 30-month prison term.
Bradley Manning pleaded guilty to ten charges on Thursday and offered a defense and explanation of his actions.
Earlier this week, the Pentagon bowed to pressure and released 84 previously unpublished trial documents from the ongoing Manning proceedings. Here are the documents themselves.
A New York Times Room for Debate section on what an act of cyberwar might actually be.
The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a challenge to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act which broadened the government’s eavesdropping abilities. This shows the difficulty in challenging anti-terrorism measures in court, and probably means that the Supreme Court will never take up consideration of FISA’s constitutionality.
An interesting new Gallup poll results show that although most Americans (more Republicans than Democrats) think that it’s important that the US have the number one military, only 50% of the country thinks we actually are number one militarily. This is a significant drop from 2010, when 64% thought we were.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: A Bahraini protester waves the national flag at demonstrations sparked by the funeral of teenager killed during protests in the village of Jabalat Habshi. Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Notice: This Week in War, both the post and the newsletter, will be on hiatus next Friday.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: A Bahraini protester waves the national flag at demonstrations sparked by the funeral of teenager killed during protests in the village of Jabalat Habshi. Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP.

As Michelle Obama hands the winning prize for best film to Argo, it joins the circle between the US military apparatus, the culture industries and the numbing of the social conscience.